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Fri Apr 26, 2013, 11:42 PM

New York Municipalities Decide To Reject Fracking Brine As Road Deicer, Though It Might Be Cheaper

GOSHEN The ingredients that make up fracking brine, which is sometimes used as a cheap alternative to road salt, are mysterious to many. But Legislator Jeffrey Berkman of Middletown said, "We know for sure that it has chemicals."

Some large cities have already started using the salty mix, which is the byproduct of hydrofracking, a controversial deep-drilling method in which huge amounts of water mixed with chemicals are injected deep into shale rock to create fissures that release natural gas. Advocates say fracking brine is more efficient and economical than road salt in de-icing roads. Natural gas drillers are eager to get rid of the waste fluid, which is a "consumptive water use," meaning it cannot be recycled.

There's been much public suspicion regarding the chemical mix, especially since drillers refuse to divulge the ingredients, calloing them "proprietary trade secrets."

Legislators supporting the use of fracking brine say seminars have taught them the brine is perfectly safe. One legislator had heard the mix was "99 percent pure water." But most other legislators were dubious and asked for further study and disclosure of the ingredients. They were also concerned that brine mixtures may differ, depending on the vendor.

EDIT

http://chroniclenewspaper.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130426/NEWS01/130429967/Fracking-brine-nixed-for-de-icing-roads

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Reply New York Municipalities Decide To Reject Fracking Brine As Road Deicer, Though It Might Be Cheaper (Original post)
hatrack Apr 2013 OP
appal_jack Apr 2013 #1
Nihil May 2013 #2
razee May 2013 #3
limpyhobbler May 2013 #4

Response to hatrack (Original post)

Sat Apr 27, 2013, 03:24 PM

1. Is there no end to the insanity?

 

Spread fracking brine on our public roads?!?!? Who would think this a good idea?

Years ago, I lived near Times Beach, MO. The dioxin contamination that caused the whole town to be evacuated arrived via trucks spreading waste oil on dirt roads to control dust. Their legislators were told THAT was safe back in the day, too.

Industrial wastes of any sorts do not belong on roadways where all of us travel. Glad that Goshen got it right, but very scared to imagine all the municipalities who are not thinking this issue through as thoroughly.

-app

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Response to hatrack (Original post)

Thu May 2, 2013, 01:07 PM

2. What kind of a complete and utter cretin thinks that this could *possibly* be a good idea?

 

I mean, seriously?

> Natural gas drillers are eager to get rid of the waste fluid, which is a "consumptive water use,"
> meaning it cannot be recycled.

> drillers refuse to divulge the ingredients

> A truck carrying fracking waste was quarantined and then sent back to where it came from
> after its contents triggered a radiation alarm at a Pennsylvania hazardous-waste landfill.
> The trucks load was nearly 10 times more radioactive than is permitted at the dump
(via http://www.democraticunderground.com/112741980)

Just how can ANYONE justify spreading this toxic shit across the public highway when the
frackers aren't even allowed to dispose of it in a hazardous-waste landfill?



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Response to hatrack (Original post)

Thu May 2, 2013, 02:06 PM

3. New York has the best elected officials money can buy. n/t

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Response to hatrack (Original post)

Fri May 3, 2013, 08:57 PM

4. How are they allowed to call it "brine"? That's a word with a definition.

brine
1
a : water saturated or strongly impregnated with common salt
b : a strong saline solution (as of calcium chloride)

2
the water of a sea or salt lake
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/brine

Seems deceptive to call it brine when it has other ingredients. And isn't it radioactive so wtf are they thinking here?


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